/ Special Olympics Event Scores Big with Domo Volunteers

Around here, when we use the term “beast mode,” it’s usually in reference to a popular feature in the Domo platform that makes it simpler for users to interpret their data.

But on June 21, a few colleagues and I found ourselves using it while watching Matthew Perkins compete in the Special Olympics Utah 2019 Summer Games at Mountain View High School just south of Domo headquarters.

In the final lap of the 3,000-meter run, the 16-year-old cross-country enthusiast shifted from cruise control to maximum overdrive and won the event by a landslide.

Immediately afterward, Matthew was quick to talk about the exhilaration he felt coming down the stretch.

“We runners call it a runner’s high,” he said with a smile from ear to ear. “You just feel like you can go faster and faster without getting tired. It’s the best feeling in the world.”

For me and all the other Domo employees who came to support an organization that helps transform lives through the joy of sport, it was a great feeling as well.

Every day, Special Olympics Utah empowers athletes to shatter stereotypes and exceed their personal bests on the playing field and in life. The Summer Games epitomizes that commitment.

Tyler Major, Partner Relationship Manager at Domo, made the trek all the way from Kaysville—about a 90-minute drive from the venue—to volunteer. His reasons were simple.

“I have a neighbor with autism and I just thought it would be fun to come down and help out,” he said. “Plus, it’s Friday and the sun’s out, so why not?”

One of our engineering all-stars, Bret Bills, was also there, along with his 8th-grade daughter who has a couple of friends with differing abilities.

“It’s one of the things I love so much about Domo,” Bret said. “The fact that the company encourages all of us to participate in community events like this, even during work hours, means a lot to me and my family.” 

Alex Humble, who works in our finance department, echoed that sentiment with his actions. The Portland transplant and recent BYU grad spent the majority of his time in the staging area, engaging racers with dance moves and secret handshakes.

For that, he earned a new friend—a 9-year-old boy named Bo who wanted nothing more than to get his picture taken with Alex.

“I had no idea what to expect today,” Alex said afterward. “It turned out to be one of the coolest experiences I’ve had in a while.”